Category Archives: power

sea-mouse inspired wire for micro circuits

SeaMouse.jpg.w560h311The sea mouse lives at the bottom of northern seas. Actually a worm, the creature’s name results from its furry appearance. The size of a thumb, the sea mouse is covered with many thousands of crystalline fibers called setae. These strands shimmer with iridescent colors as they reflect sunlight which filters downward hundreds of feet.

The setae are about 100 nanometers in diameter. This is about four millionths of an inch, several times smaller than a human hair. In addition, the sea mouse fibers are hollow tubes. Researchers in Finland and Norway have successfully used these fibers in a valuable high tech application.

Technical application:

nano circuits, mediacal implants

Continue reading sea-mouse inspired wire for micro circuits

electric eel inspires for medical implant

Electric_eelThe 650 volts of electricity and one ampere of current is sufficient to stun large sea creatures within about two meters distance.

The electric eel’s ability comes from 5000-6000 internal layers of cells or electroplaques, stacked in a series circuit like the cells of a car battery.

 

Technical application:

medical devices

Continue reading electric eel inspires for medical implant

mimic the dragon fish; put chlorophyll into your eye for higher night vison sensitivity

dragon_fish Many marine creatures produce chemical light in a process called bioluminescence. The typical color produced is blue. One group of deep-sea fish, however, called the Malacosteid family, produce an unusual nightvisionred color. They are also called dragon-fish or loose-jaws. Other fish cannot see or detect the red color, so dragon-fish are able to communicate with each other in secret.

Technical application:

night vision

Continue reading mimic the dragon fish; put chlorophyll into your eye for higher night vison sensitivity

Dolphin-Monofin

dolphin-inspired-man-made-fin_1Many sea creatures including dolphins, porpoises, and whales have a tail structure that results in impressive bursts of speed. Their tail fin, called a fluke, is waved back and forth to provide forward motion. Meanwhile, the pectoral and dorsal fins provide directional stability. Dolphins reach speeds of 30-40 miles/hour (48-64 km/hr) and can leap completely out of water. Similarly, massive whales are able to breach or break from the water surface as they churn their tails.

Technical application:

Continue reading Dolphin-Monofin

CO2 gas could be converted to concret

PillarCoralCement is made from limestone and other ingredients in a high temperature kiln process above 1300°C. One by product of the cement preparation is a large amount of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas which is not friendly to the environment when in excess amounts.
Scientists at Stanford University, led by Brent Constantz, have found an alternative to traditional cement production. They study coral which forms the largest biologically formed structures in the world.

Technical application:

convert CO2 gas from powerplants to concret

Continue reading CO2 gas could be converted to concret

stegosaurus plates for innovative wind-turbines

dinotail stegosaurusThousands of wind turbines have been installed worldwide in recent years for the production of clean electric energy. Efforts continue to make the large turbines efficient and quiet. One successful modification of existing turbine blades is inspired by the stegosaur.

 

Technical application:

improve fluid-turbines

Continue reading stegosaurus plates for innovative wind-turbines

Leaves learn us how to produce electricity and harvest water

Transpiration is the evaporation of water from the leaves of plants and trees. The undersidesTranspiration_Xerophyte.jpg of leaves are dotted with hundreds of tiny openings called stoma. Carbon dioxide enters the leaf through these pores, and water escapes.  A mature tree may evaporate hundreds of gallons of water on a warm, dry day. The process cools the vegetation and also allows the internal flow of nutrients. The familiar veins within leaves transmit the water to the stoma. Studies have shown that the branching Tomato_leaf_stomate.jpg.w300h307veins, called a dendrite pattern, are spaced out for maximum water flow. This leaf vein pattern may help design engineers build more efficient irrigation systems.

Tomato leaf stoma

 

Technical application:

generate  , harvest water

Continue reading Leaves learn us how to produce electricity and harvest water

Salt-Nano wire for high speed data transfer

salt We are all familiar with table salt, or sodium chloride (NaCl). This essential, common compound is ordinarily crystalline and brittle in nature. However, many materials behave strangely on the scale of minute quantities, and salt is no efirewirexception. Researchers at Boston College have explored tiny salt samples at close distance using an atomic force microscope.

 

Technical application:

high speed data transfer

Continue reading Salt-Nano wire for high speed data transfer